267 posts categorized in "Wildlife"

 

This fellow looked a little grumpy when we first met him. But that’s because he was prematurely bumped out of the nest by his larger siblings, and he had tumbled some 60 feet to the ground. Fortunately, he was able to slow his fall enough with his still-developing flight feathers to avoid serious injury. But a city street is not a safe place for a young Merlin not yet able to fly, so one of the bird’s concerned human neighbors snatched him up and brought him to PAWS.

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Continue reading "A Merlin Family Reunion" »

 

Two blog posts from earlier this year documented the return of a Great Horned Owl and two Barn Owls to their respective nest sites. Returning baby owls to their parents is always the best option, but unfortunately, sometimes the bird’s health or other circumstances make this impossible. Such is the case for five owls currently in care at PAWS.

The first owl is a young Great Horned who was admitted to the wildlife center on May 8. He was found on the ground along a popular walking trail in Woodinville, appearing to be in distress. At PAWS, we discovered that the bird was anemic and suffering from a blood parasite. He’s undergoing treatment for the parasite and is recovering well in our care.

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Continue reading "Oodles of Owls" »

PAWSwalk 2013 is coming!

 

PAWSwalk 2013

Join PAWS and other animal-lovers from all over the greater Seattle area for the 22nd Annual PAWSwalk at King County's Marymoor Park on Saturday, September 7.

Enjoy a walk in the park and some fun in the sun with your friends, family and favorite canines!

There will also be great pet-friendly businesses, an interactive Kids Zone, delicous food from popular Seattle food trucks, and yes—the Pours for PAWS beer and mimosa garden will be back again this year!

Have fun and help raise more than $180,000 to benefit the animals at PAWS.

Register for PAWSwalk today!

 


Mountain Beavers are common and widespread in Western Washington, but few people would recognize one if they saw it. This is because, for the most part, they are rarely seen. They are quiet and inconspicuous animals, creating burrows in steep ravines and gullies that humans rarely enter. But on May 17, a juvenile Mountain Beaver in Edmonds was anything but inconspicuous as he sat in the middle of the road. Fortunately, a kind human scooped him up before any harm befell him and brought him to the PAWS Wildlife Center.

The young Mountain Beaver was dehydrated and lethargic, but uninjured. The species has a poorly developed sense of sight and hearing, and if they become separated from their burrows and well-worn surface trails, they easily become lost. Found only one block away from prime habitat, that is likely what happened to this Mountain Beaver.

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Continue reading "A Wayward Mountain Beaver Gets A Second Chance" »


On June 6, 2012, the PAWS Blog featured a story about the wildlife center’s newest ursine patient. Found orphaned on a roadside in Oregon and weighing in at less than four pounds, this little female was the 78th Black Bear to be cared for at PAWS. She was also heartbreakingly adorable, and a photo of her sitting in a box while waiting to be weighed made national news.

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That photo was taken on May 25, 2012. More than a year later, on June 4, 2013, I took another photo of the cub as we were preparing to tranquilize her for her pre-release exam. On that day, she weighed in at 88 pounds, but we had to gather that information while she was sedated rather than simply plopping her in a box. 

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Continue reading "Baby Bear One Year Later" »

 

On May 17 we said goodbye to four orphaned bear cubs who had been in our care for the better part of a year. Two of the cubs were a brother and sister who arrived at PAWS last July after their mother was killed by a car. The other two were brothers who came to us last October after their mother was shot by a hunter.

Together with three other orphans from Oregon, the bear cubs thrived under our care. By the time we tranquilized and examined them on May 16 in preparation for their release, the smallest cub weighed in at 115 pounds, and the largest tipped the scales at 175 pounds. All four were fitted with GPS tracking collars before they were placed in their transport carriers.

Black Bear exam before release

Continue reading "Freedom for Four Orphaned Bears" »

 

It seemed to be raining owls recently at a horse barn in Redmond, WA. Two downy, white Barn Owl babies had plopped down on the barn's sandy floor, and it wasn't immediately clear whether or not their parents were still in the area. The babies were brought to PAWS for an examination. They were found to be dehydrated and a little bit skinny, but otherwise healthy. After fluids and a meal, they even got a little bit feisty with their caretakers.

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Continue reading "Back to the Barn for Two Baby Barn Owls" »

 

When it happens, we call it a roadstrike. It's a very serious situation that happens to water birds, usually loons or grebes, who cannot take flight without first running on top of the water to gain speed. Roadstrikes occur when these birds mistake the wet surface of a road or parking lot for the shimmering surface of a body of water. They come in for a landing, often injuring themselves during the unexpectedly-hard touchdown, and then they're stranded. Without human intervention, they usually don't have long before they move from the category of roadstrike to roadkill. Thankfully, that was not to be the fate of a Pied-billed Grebe who crashed down near the Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle.

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Continue reading "Quick turn-around for a Pied-billed Grebe" »