By Jen Mannas, PAWS Naturalist

Most of the patients at PAWS Wildlife Center are either feathered or furred, but every once in a while we get a patient of the amphibian persuasion.

On March 16, a Northwestern Salamander was brought to PAWS for care. He was found lying on AstroTurf, away from any suitable habitat, and appeared to be limping.

This isn’t surprising considering all of the rain we'd had the weekend before. Although Northwestern Salamanders spend the majority of their time underground, they're most active above ground after heavy rains.

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Northwestern Salamanders are medium sized and dark colored with a short, rounded head. Very common in western Washington and found in moist habitats, they're breeding during this time of year which makes them more active.

They lay clusters of eggs on underwater plants and grass. It can take at least 12 to 14 months for larvae to transform into metamorphosed adults and emerge from the water. However, some never fully transform and spend their entire life in the water.

Larvae and adults are mildly poisonous and can emit a sticky poison to keep predators away. Adults will even lash their tail to spread the poison around.

Lucky for us, our salamander patient never displayed this behavior!

An examination by our expert wildlife rehabilitators determined that he didn't have any injuries and was walking normally. And so, after just two days in our care, he was released in a moist area near where he was found.

Inspired by our work? Make a gift and help us continue providing a safe haven for wildlife in need.

Interested in a career in wildlife rehabilitation? Check out internship/externship opportunities at PAWS.

 


By Jen Mannas, PAWS Naturalist

This month, in Washington, wildlife is on the move – which makes it prime time for wildlife viewing!

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Some wildlife species are coming out of hibernation while others are migrating, competing for breeding territories, and starting to attract mates.

To highlight just a few:

  • Grey Whales are passing through heading north to their feeding grounds in the Arctic
  • Seabirds are moving to their breeding grounds
  • Sandhill Cranes are stopping over in the Columbia Basin on their way to Alaska

PAWS may not treat all of the species listed above here in our dedicated wildlife rehabilitation facilities, but this is the time of year we receive other species who are on the move as well.

We recently cared for a Silver Haired Bat who was seeking warmth in someone’s living room—pictured below, being measured to identify which species it is—and two adult Anna’s Hummingbirds and a Red-breasted Sapsucker, who were all found on the ground unable to fly.

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When wildlife moves through an urban environment species can often come into contact with hazards they wouldn’t normally experience in a more natural setting. They may run into a window, get struck by a vehicle, or get attacked by a domestic animal.

When incidents like these happen, they may need our help.

So, while you're out enjoying the fresh air and warmer temperatures this spring, keep an eye out for wildlife who may need a helping hand.

Found a wild animal in need? 
If you're near Lynnwood in Washington, find out how PAWS can help. If you're outside Washington State, we would recommend you reaching out to your local wildlife rehabilitation facility or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for advice. 

This month, there are also plenty of opportunities for us to celebrate and learn about the wildlife moving through the state. Check out some of these fun festivals:

The “Wings Over Water” Northwest Birding Festival (March 13-15) is an annual event that features wildlife viewing field trips in the NW corner of Washington.

Make a date with the Tundra Swan Festival, an annual event commemorating the return of the tundra swans to NE Washington. It happens March 21 in Usk, Washington. 

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The Othello Sandhill Crane Festival takes place in Othello, Washington (March 27-29) and highlights the spring return of Sandhill Cranes to the greater Othello area and Columbia National Wildlife Refuge.

If you're looking for something a little closer to home, keep the last week in March in mind and head down to Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge (between Tacoma and Olympia).

You can view hundreds of migrating waterfowl and other wading birds, like the Great Blue Heron pictured right who was photographed there last year.

For recent whale sightings, you can check out the Orca Network.

And, as if all these fantastic events weren't enough to keep you busy, did you know we're right in the middle of National Wildlife Week

This year's event, organized by the National Wildlife Federation and running through March 15, celebrates the joys and challenges of living with wildlife

Happy wildlife viewing, and peaceful co-existing with our wild neighbors!

Want to get involved with wildlife rehabilitation at PAWS? Become a volunteer or consider our internship opportunities.

Inspired by our work? Make a gift and help us continue providing a safe haven for wildlife in need.


By Kellie Benz, PAWS Staff

Her eyes draw you in. The expressions she has; hopeful but weary, happy but nervous. It’s mostly the hopeful and happy part of her that makes you instantly like her. Once she knows you've seen her, her tail begins to wag. Not a small wag, a wide sweeping side-to-side wag that makes all of her little body sway back and forth almost knocking her over. 

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This is Betty Blue. She’s 6 years old—we estimate—and, despite every scar that marks her coat, she keeps putting her faith in humans.

It’s the scar that surrounds her muzzle that you notice first. That one is a deep scar that crosses her snout, then divides down both of her cheeks. That’s the puzzling one, the one that breaks your heart when you imagine how it could be that no one noticed her pain.

Once you step up to Betty Blue—and how can you not with that clumsy wag of hers—that’s when you see the real damage of human unkindness.

On her back, starting between her shoulder blades and slicing right down her spine, is a scar so thick and wide that you have to believe someone, anyone with a heart, saw that she was in need. 

Surprisingly, no one did. Because that’s not what saved her.

You see, Betty Blue is who saved Betty Blue. To be specific she saved her puppies but, in doing so, she saved herself too.

Betty Blue is from northern California and, after giving birth to a litter of pups in a field alongside a canal, she reached out to strangers for help. When a group of workers gathered nearby, she bounded towards them, urging them to help her with the babies she had lovingly kept safe.

The workers surmised that the birth had recently occurred, yet who knows how many days she waited for help?

Inspired by her motherly instinct to save her little ones, the workers scooped up the vulnerable pups and Betty Blue and got the whole family to a local shelter. Heroes for heroes as they say. Problem was, the shelter didn’t have room for a grown mom dog and her litter of pups.

They did, however, have a partner in the shelter world and that partner was PAWS.

“As soon as we knew she was on her way, we started reaching out to our community to help,” explained Kay Joubert, Director of Companion Animal Services. “Our shelter staff prepared for her arrival and our Foster Care team contacted their emergency foster homes in anticipation of the puppies’ needs.”

For their car ride north, Betty Blue and her puppies were wrapped up and safely crated with warm blankets, and given lots of food and water.

That’s when new troubles began. Busted tires, engine problems, inclement weather, and road closures plagued their trip. Through it all, Betty Blue kept nursing her defenseless little ones every leg of the tumultuous journey.

“We knew they were having some problems along the way, but we were ready for Betty Blue and her family,” Kay added.

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After 18 grueling hours, Betty Blue and her puppies met the PAWS volunteer transport team in Washington State. Her babies—by then weaned—were received in PAWS Foster Care and sent to homes where they could grow stronger, able and ready for lives with new families.

Betty Blue herself was hurried into PAWS' veterinary clinic for a check over.

“With everything she had been through, she was remarkably healthy.” Kay explained. “The scars on her body had healed and left marks only she knows the source of and, with any luck, will soon forget.”

While her healthy puppies thrive in the safe homes of loving foster parents, Betty Blue rests up and recovers. Her sad, scary days are now behind her.

She doesn't have to go it alone any more, now she has a team of friends looking out for her just like she looked out for her pups.

At PAWS, little Betty Blue wins over every animal caretaker she meets. That wiggly-waggle of a tail, those expressive eyes and that hope she has is contagious.

She reminds you that, despite what you’ve been through, it’s the future that matters the most.

For Betty Blue, we can’t wait to see who will come along and make her future as bright as her hopeful eyes. 

Are you just the person to give Betty Blue her forever home? Find out more about her and all the other companion animals we champion here.

Would you like to join the ranks of our PAWS Foster Program? It's for anyone who has the home and an open heart for animals in need. Find out about our next orientation class here.


By Jen Mannas, PAWS Naturalist

With daylight savings just around the corner, it's that invigorating time of year when the weather starts to feel warmer and the days are getting longer.Spring is upon us, and with it comes baby season at PAWS Wildlife Center.

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Our dedicated team of wildlife volunteers are very busy right now, preparing our facility for the arrival of our first mammal babies of the year.

Did you know that, every year, PAWS cares for more than 800 baby mammals in our tailor-made mammal nurseries?

The kinds of babies we see brought into our wildlife hospital include flying squirrels (pictured, right), Townsend’s chipmunks and raccoons; just to name a few.

We couldn't care for so many wild animals in need without our volunteers—and, well before the arrival of the first babies, their involvement kicks off with the less cute but just as crucial business of DIY.

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From repairing old wooden hide boxes and building new ones (see Jodi, pictured right, measuring up a new box), to sewing mini hammocks and preparing the deer pen, there's a lot to get ready.

Volunteers also help with setting up and stocking all of the nurseries, building haul outs for the seals, and giving our nursery a fresh coat of paint.

So, who do we expect to be the first patients this year?

Squirrels are typically the first baby mammals to arrive, in the early spring. 

When they arrive they're small and still very reliant on mom. Put on a strict feeding schedule they're monitored by our rehabilitation staff, and volunteers are responsible for their feedings and for cleaning their enclosures. 

Everyone works together to keep these babies healthy as they grow, and prepare them for their return to the wild.

If you're inspired by all this activity and would like to get involved, there's still time to sign up and help this baby season! Find out more about volunteering at PAWS and how you can help raise baby mammals this summer.


Inspired by this story? Make a gift and help us continue providing a safe haven for wildlife in need.
Found a wild animal? Find out what to do and how PAWS can help.


By Katherine Spink, PAWS Staff

Adopted by Estelle and her husband back in April 2013, the once-fearful Maki has blossomed into a playful cuddle bug. We caught up with Estelle recently and she gave us this wonderful update on life since becoming a PAWS parent!

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What made you decide to adopt from a shelter?
My husband and I wanted to give a forever home to a shelter cat and specifically, we wanted to adopt a "less adoptable" adult cat.

We adopted from PAWS because we’ve made donations in the past and are avid followers of this local non-profit.

What was it that most attracted you to Maki?
Maki needed very specific living conditions: the only pet, in a home without children with a predictable environment. She was a perfect match for our life choice.

The fact that Maki wasn't cooperative during the visit didn't stop us from wanting to adopt her. If anything, it made us want to take care of her even more. I knew that with time, her and I would become best friends.

How would you describe her personality?
Maki is a gentle little cuddle bug at heart, she loves to be held and be kissed behind her ears and, now that we’ve won her heart, she sleeps by our side every night.

She loves to play hide and seek, loves to pounce, and loves to place her feather toys all around the house for us. She’s a little kitten at heart, so playful!

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How was your adoption experience with PAWS?
I’m amazed at how accurately PAWS outlined her personality and what was best for her. 

Our success was a combination of what we had to offer and PAWS’ dedication in finding the right homes for the pets waiting for adoption. 

Tell us about your first journey home and how Maki settled in.
Maki was stressed from all the changes that had happened in her kitty life in such a short time, and she was very scared initially. Soon after arriving home, however, her instincts took over and she went in all the rooms to explore and smell.

All in all, it took about a year for Maki to adapt to her new home. It was hard for her to trust that this change in her life was beneficial to her.

We learned to be patient and gentle with her and let her decide when she’d had enough interaction. Hissing, biting, hiding became less and less frequent and she gradually became more and more confident and relaxed.

What have you experienced together since Maki came home?
Maki and I are very attached to one another. When I am home, she follows me around everywhere! She thinks my husband and I are big kitties and she loves to play tag with us. She is of course better at it than me. We also race each other up the stairs but once again, she always wins!

Our living room is her playground and we often watch the squirrels and birds out the window together. She loves to wake my husband up in the morning by walking all over him!

How has Maki changed your life?
Maki has taught me to let go and relax; because she can sense stress, it was important that we learned to be attentive to our levels of stress in our interactions with her.

Maki also taught me to never give up. I had times where I thought that Maki would never open up to us, but I never stopped wanting to be her human friend. I am glad I was patient with her and let her adopt us at her own pace.

My husband mentioned that, when she hears my car pull up in the driveway, she runs to the door meowing and when I open it, all I see my little furry girl with her tail up, ready to be picked up for a snuggle. This moment always brightens my day.

She taught me that trust from a furry friend is a precious gift, earned from a real connection heart to heart. I love her to pieces.

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Any advice for people considering adopting a cat?
I think that the key to a successful adoption is to assess and understand the needs of the cat you want to adopt and make sure that your home offers the best conditions to raise a happy cat.

Don't be discouraged by the bumps on the road helping your feline friend adapt to her new home. It can take years for an adult cat to reach true happiness. Let your kitty build a relationship with you. Trust her to bond with you and the day she will, it will be for life!

If you come across behavioral issues, don't stay alone with your questions and concerns, you can find great support and advice in so many places: PAWS, for instance, has a behaviorist and variety of online resources. Above all, keep the faith—very simple changes can turn a scared kitty into a happy feline.

Finally, when you adopt an adult cat, unlearn all your assumptions and start over with that special little friend that you brought home! Praise and reward verbally and with treats—just like dogs, cats love to please too!

Estelle—we're so very thankful that Maki found you and your husband! Your kindness, patience, honesty and encouragement will be an inspiration to many other families looking to adopt. Wishing you all many play-filled years ahead!

Find your Maki todayadopt.
Donate now and help us continue providing a safe place for companion animals in need.


By Jen Mannas, PAWS Naturalist

What one of our newest patients at PAWS Wildlife Center lacks in size, he more than makes up for in personality! 

This patient is Ruddy Duck #15-0135. Weighing in at just under one pound, he was found in a parking lot with wounds on his head, wings, and feet.

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Ruddy Ducks are very common in Washington; they breed in the eastern region and winter in the coastal region of the state.

Their unique breeding plumage and strange behavior has fascinated naturalists and birders alike since the early 1920’s.

During the breeding season the males sport a bright sky blue colored bill, white cheek patches on their black head and their body is a striking cinnamon color.

They are the only stiff tailed duck in Washington and the only duck that habitually holds its long black tail upright when surface swimming.

Ruddy Ducks also have very unique breeding behavior; the male will beat his bill against his chest creating vibrations in the water. These vibrations cause ripples and bubbles making his presence known to other ducks in the area.

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Despite being one of the smallest species of diving ducks in the United States, Ruddy Ducks are also one of the feistiest.

They are very aggressive toward other ducks and wildlife species. They have even been known to chase wildlife away that are feeding along shorelines.

We have definitely noticed some of that spunk in this Ruddy Duck patient!

When staff approach his pool for feedings he pulls back his neck, opens his bill and hisses (pictured, right); sometimes he even tries to charge us in his pool when we directly care for him.

After an initial round of wound management by our veterinary team this Ruddy Duck patient is doing well and spends his days swimming, diving, and preening in his pool (see the video below). 

The rehabilitation team have been working hard to keep him nutritionally and behaviorally healthy while his wounds heal and his waterproofing improves—both of which are vital for his release.

Can't see the video? Try watching it on our Vimeo channel instead.

Patient update, February 19: with wounds fully healed and waterproofing assessed, our feisty Ruddy Duck patient was deemed ready for release and happily reintroduced to his natural habitat.

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Inspired by this story? Make a gift and help us continue providing a safe haven for wildlife in need.
Found a wild animal? Find out what to do and how PAWS can help.


By Kellie Benz, PAWS Staff

If you’ve ever spent an hour in an animal shelter, you can attest that the smiling, happy faces eager to greet you are the ones you notice first. It’s all so very human of us to be drawn to the strangers who are just happy to meet us. Who can blame anyone? We all just want to be liked.

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But not every personality is excited for new people.

It happens, from time to time, that a companion animal in our care just needs some get-to-know you time before their true personality comes shining through. Right now, Rambo is that guy.

Rambo holds a lot of magic that he just won’t reveal to strangers. We’ve talked to him about holding back his magnificence, but being Rambo, he refuses to listen.

What we’ve now learned about Rambo—since he began his stay with PAWS back in July of last year—is that he’s an enigma and he likes it that way.

He pretends like he’s content, but we know he wants his own home and his own special someone who can see his awesome.

We know this because every day we watch Rambo begrudgingly suffer through the many curious cat adopters who are drawn to PAWS Cat City.

Some meet him with cooing enthusiasm, a decidedly unpleasant greeting for our Rambo. He prefers to set the tone of interactions, and he usually chooses the 'off' button.

He loves to play, but he prefers to decide when, what toy and for how long the play will last. He doesn’t take kindly to strangers making suggestions.

We know that he wants his own home because we end each night at PAWS Cat City watching him lumber his fluffy black and white-ness from his own private cat condo to his overnight room.

There, he settles in for yet another night of his over 6 months stay knowing that, tomorrow, he starts it all again.

You can see in his eyes that he finds the task of pretending to be interested in strangers a burden of his current circumstance. We here at PAWS have tried to take the burden off of Rambo.

We’ve highlighted him on Warm 106.9’s Wet Nose Wednesday (watch his moment in the spotlight below), we’ve made him a featured pet, and we’ve created #RescueRambo then splashed his hashtag and pictures across our social media.

Can't see the video embedded above? Click here to watch it on YouTube.

Still, his perfect match eludes us.

So we thought it was time to reveal a secret. Like most grumbly grumplepants, Rambo’s mysteries aren’t that mysterious at all. “My favorite thing about Rambo is how his eyes light up when he sees me coming and he runs to the door to greet me,” explained Steph Renaud, our resident cat aficionado and PAWS Cat City Supervisor. “What he lacks in first impressions, he makes up for in his ability to bond, and his intelligence.”

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It seems fitting that, on the eve of Valentine’s Day, we reveal the truth about our biggest-hearted lovebug. 

Forgive us, Rambo, for telling the world what we know to be true about you. He may have a big coat of the fluffiest of fluffy black and white fur, but we think his heart is twice that size.

Interested in Rambo? A little warning, he’s a slow slow get-to-know, so only those with high levels of delayed gratification need apply.

We can promise you this—the big payoff of Rambo’s heart leaping at your arrival home is worth every second of patience.

Could you #RescueRambo and be his one and only? Check out his official profile here and come on down to PAWS Cat City today!

Read about the adoption process at PAWS.
Help us continue providing a safe haven for companion animals in need. Donate now.
Meet all our current companions patiently waiting for forever homes.


By Jen Mannas, PAWS Naturalist

Welcome to a new segment we, at PAWS, like to call What’s Happening in Washington, where we bring you news about what's happening in our area relating to wildlife—including research, events, and ways you can get involved.

The month of February brings the 18th annual Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC). From February 13th to 16th The National Audubon Society and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology are asking citizen scientists like you to help them count birds.

Every year the GBBC is conducted all over the world. In 2014, 142,051 participants from 135 countries counted over 17 million birds encompassing 4,300 different species. Pretty impressive!

Participation is easy, open to all age groups, and is a fun family activity. Register online for the GBBC, count birds in your yard for at least 15 minutes on one or more days during the GBBC and then enter your results on the GBBC website. It’s that simple.

You can even explore what others are seeing all over the world and take a look at the bird photographs submitted in real time.

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The data collected from the GBBC gives researchers a snapshot of the distribution and abundance of birds all around the world. These counts are then combined with data from other projects to help researchers gain a better understanding of bird biology.

They can gain insight into how weather influences bird populations, changes in bird migrations, how diseases are affecting bird populations and how species diversity has changed.

At PAWS Wildlife Center we feel connected to this project because we receive almost two thousand backyard birds from the Seattle area every year.

Some of the birds you see in your backyard may have even been treated at PAWS (recent patients are pictured, right).

PAWS is happy to be participating in the GBBC this year and will be counting the wild birds living at our Lynnwood campus.

Lets all get outside this weekend, count birds and be citizen scientists! Let's see if we can get Washington in the top ten for the total number of participants in the United States (last year we were #14 with 3,356 participants).

For more information about the GBBC, and to get tips on how to identify bird species, please visit the official GBBC website.

Happy Birding!

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Help backyard birds in need. Become a Bird Nursery Caretaker at PAWS.

Make a gift and help us continue providing a safe haven for injured and baby backyard birds.

Interested in a career caring for wild birds? Check out our Avian Wildlife Rehabilitation internship.


By Katherine Spink, PAWS Staff

Robbie Thorson started at PAWS as a volunteer, then progressed to an internship before becoming a Seasonal Assistant Wildlife Rehabilitator last summer.

A college graduate in biology, with a focus on ecology and evolution, Robbie will soon start his second six-month stint as a seasonal assistant rehabilitator. He takes us behind the scenes to reveal more about this vital hands-on role assisting permanent staff at PAWS Wildlife Center.

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So Robbie, what does your average day look like?
Although there’s a pattern to each shift—administering meds, feeding, helping with intake exams (pictured right with an Osprey patient), fixing cages, cleaning—every day seems different because of the variety of species we see coming in and their individual needs.

One of the more physical activities seasonal assistants are assigned is cleaning the seabird pools, which involves wearing some super trendy bright yellow personal protective equipment and jumping right in! Not so bad when there are seabirds recuperating, but we also use these pools for Harbor Seal patients—they’re not so house-proud!

We also work with the wildlife center interns, assigning them daily duties, so you get some people management experience as well.

What do you enjoy most about the job?
The thing I love most is the variety it provides—and the opportunity to get hands on with many species that I didn’t have the chance to work with as either a volunteer or intern. From bear cubs to Bobcats, Bald Eagles to Harbor Seals, every day brings a new and fascinating learning experience.

There’s also room for progression here. During my time in college I worked a lot with birds, which is great because we see many birds coming into PAWS Wildlife Center and I can apply my knowledge in a professional setting. But now I also have so much additional knowledge and experience thanks to assisting with the care of mammals, marine mammals, reptiles… whatever comes through the door in need of our help.

Undoubtedly one of the most rewarding things I experience first-hand is the transformation of a wild animal in need of urgent care to a healthy animal ready to go back into the wild. There can be touch and go moments along the way but when it comes to the release day (weeks or months later), you get an amazing buzz knowing you’ve had a part to play in that animal’s rehabilitation and return to its natural habitat.

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Robbie (far left) assisting with a raccoon release

Has there been a stand-out experience for you?
In October 2014, we were involved in the rehabilitation and care of a juvenile male Steller Sea Lion, found stranded on a beach in need of help. Caring for this species was a first for PAWS, and a pretty special moment in my time here!

As a seasonal assistant, I was called on to help with the handling of the sea lion—a great privilege. In his early days with us he was very weak and hardly struggled when we were needed to help with feeding or health checks, but just days later it took two or three people to handle him!

A few weeks after his arrival, I helped prepare him for transfer to a marine mammal center in California, where he would continue his rehabilitation with other sea lions. All in all—a pretty amazing experience, and an example of how varied this job can be. One day you’re syringe-feeding baby squirrels, the next you’re assisting with a Steller Sea Lion!

Watch footage of our first ever Steller Sea Lion, and his rehabilitation story, here.

Who would be well-suited to this role?
If you’re interested in wildlife rehabilitation as a career, I’d definitely recommend applying for this position at PAWS. You do hit the ground running when you start, so some prior experience would be helpful. I found it really useful to have started as a volunteer and worked my way up.

PAWS wildlife center is the only rehabilitation center in Washington State equipped with immediate and continual veterinary expertise and services, all in-house. It’s a great place to work, and a fantastic organization to have on your resume.

Think this might just be the right job for you? We’re accepting applications for this seasonal position (April 1-September 30 2015) until Friday, February 13. Find out more and apply today.


Find out more about wildlife rehabilitation at PAWS.
Start your journey towards a career with wildlife. Volunteer at PAWS.
There's another way you can help us continue helping wild animals in need. Donate now.


By Jen Mannas, PAWS Naturalist

When it comes to American Black Bears we have a full house at PAWS Wildlife Center with five bears this winter.

Our three oldest bears are being housed under cooler conditions allowing them to rest and “hibernate” which means they essentially decrease their activity and sleep most of the day. This really makes our animal care staff happier because these bears aren’t messing up their enclosures as often!

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The littlest bears are our newer patients and were both found wandering alone; too young to survive without mom.

They were captured and brought to PAWS by state wildlife officers for rehabilitation on November 17th and on December 31st.

They were both approximately 20lbs, which is very small for this time of year, and they were thin and anemic on intake.

When the last bear cub arrived she was housed separately for a short time to ensure she was healthy enough to join our other small cub.

After a typical quarantine period the two littlest bears were introduced to each other slowly at first; now every day they grow more attached to one another as they play and sleep together.

While undergoing rehabilitation, it is crucial for young animals to be housed with others of their species (conspecifics). This reduces habituation and boredom. They also learn how to identify, find and compete for natural foods as well as how to behave, communicate and socialize.

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This is especially important for young bears as they learn through direct observation and participation with other bears.

Bear cubs would normally learn from their mothers in the wild but as this isn’t an option for our small cubs, housing them together to learn from one another is the next best thing.

These PAWS’ bears will be housed together until their release back into the wild in the springtime, when food is abundant, in the mountains of Washington State.

Check out the video below of them searching for food in their enclosure:

Can't see this video? Watch it on our Vimeo channel instead.


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Found a wild animal? Find out what to do and how PAWS can help.