« Abby: Where is she now? | Main | Species Spotlight: Pacific Wren »

by JaneA Kelley, PAWS Staff

Why do we talk so much about spaying and neutering? Quite simply put, it saves lives.

When you put it into numbers, the case for spaying and neutering our pets is extremely compelling. A dog can have two litters per year, with an average of six to 10 puppies per litter. That’s 12 to 20 puppies a year for every intact female dog.

Mom cat and kittens
Photo CC-BY hurricanemaine


A cat can have two to three litters per year with an average of four to six kittens per litter. That’s between eight and 18 kittens a year for every intact female cat.

A rabbit can have up to 14 babies per litter and can become pregnant again within minutes of giving birth. With the average rabbit pregnancy lasting between 28 and 31 days, one rabbit could become mom to 168 babies in a single year!

Add to these numbers the knock-on effect if all these babies aren’t spayed or neutered when they reach reproductive age, and you start to see how over-population occurs and why shelters like PAWS are full of unwanted, abandoned animals.

Puppies in cage
Photo CC-BY Danielle Bourgeois


A cat, dog or rabbit who is spayed or neutered not only saves lives. There are many health benefits for the animals too.

Spaying and neutering eliminates the risk of certain cancers. Since the uterus and ovaries are removed during a spay and the testicles are removed during a neuter, by getting your dog, cat or rabbit “fixed,” you’re also making sure your beloved furry friend will be protected from cancer of the reproductive organs.

Baby bunnies
Photo CC-BY normanack


Spaying also dramatically reduces the risk of breast tumors in female animals. These are the most common types of tumors in dogs and the third most common in cats. Approximately 50 percent of breast tumors in dogs and 90 percent of breast tumors in cats are malignant.

Neutering reduces a male dog or cat’s desire to roam in search of females ready to mate, which also reduces the risk of becoming separated from their loving homes, being hit by a vehicle, getting into fights with other animals or encountering larger predators.

And timing is everything.

It used to be thought that cats and dogs should be spayed after 6 months of age. However, they can get pregnant as early as 5 months of age. Now we know that kittens and puppies can be altered as early as 2 months of age (or 2 pounds in weight), and that they actually recover more quickly from surgery at this young age than they do as they get older.

Volunteer with kittens

It’s for these reasons and many more that PAWS spays and neuters every cat and dog, kitten and puppy in our care before they get adopted. PAWS also operates a spay/neuter clinic for low-income residents of the area and participates in World Spay Day every year.

In 2015, PAWS spayed and neutered 2,173 shelter dogs and cats and performed a total of 502 low-cost spay-neuter surgeries on privately owned dogs, cats and rabbits of low-income families. And thanks to a grant from the Hazel Miller Foundation, we are poised to help even more low-income families get their furry friends spayed and neutered through 2016. This grant provides free spay or neuter surgeries for cats of qualified low-income residents from the city of Edmonds, as well as clients who reside in many areas of Brier, Lynnwood, Mountlake Terrace, Woodway and parts of Unincorporated Snohomish County.

Be a hero to your furry friends and get them spayed or neutered. We’re here to help!

Volunteer with puppy

Sources: 

SpayUSA: “The Pet Owners FAQ”

ASPCA Professional: “Dealing With Concerns About Pediatric Spay/Neuter”

PetEducation.com: “FAQ on Reproduction in Dogs”

PetEducation.com: “FAQ on Reproduction in Cats”

“Why Spay or Neuter My Rabbit? Some Scary Numbers ...” by Dana Krempels, Ph.D., University of Miami 

Comments

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been posted. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment