« First Patients and Releases of 2016 | Main | Washington’s Colorful Winter Resident »

by Jen Mannas, Wildlife Naturalist

2015 was full of its ups and downs throughout the year, but the end marked some important milestones for wildlife conservation.

Here we touch on just a few important discoveries and legislative changes in the fields of wildlife management and conservation in Washington State that took place in 2015.

Fisher reintroduction to the Cascades

Right here in Washington, a species that has been absent from the Cascade Mountains for 70 years was recently reintroduced to this vast mountain range. Between December 2015 and February 2017, 80 Fishers will be translocated from Canada to the Cascades and released in hopes they will successfully repopulate the area; the first release took place on December 3.


Can't see this video? Watch it on Conservation Northwest's YouTube channel.

Fishers were trapped and poisoned to extinction in Washington by the mid-1900s and are currently listed as endangered within the state. There are high hopes this reintroduction will be successful as a similar reintroduction program restored Fishers to the Olympic Peninsula. Starting in 2008, 90 Fishers were reintroduced there over a three-year time span and are now successfully reproducing and dispersing across the peninsula. This reintroduction is a start to restore the biodiversity of the Cascades helping to balance the ecosystem and improve its health.

Washington bans transfer of ivory and other products from endangered species

Tusks-blog
Steve Oberholtze of the US Fish & Wildlife Service assembles ivory tusks on a tower for display before crushing. Photo by Ivy Allen / USFWS


Another win for Washington happened last November, when voters passed the Washington Animal Trafficking Initiative 1401 with more than 1 million votes. This bill prohibits the purchase, sale and distribution of 10 endangered species groups and their parts including elephant ivory, tiger, lion, leopard and pangolin parts, as well as sea turtle eggs and shark fins, in the state. This is the first ever comprehensive state ban on the commerce of endangered species in the United States. There is hope this will set a precedent for others states.

New wolf pack documented in Washington


U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service confirmed a new wolf pack in Washington. The Loup Loup pack was found near Twisp and Omak in Okanogan County in December. This brings the total number of wolf packs in Washington to a minimum of 17.

Biologists have been snow-tracking the pack to confirm the number of wolves within it and have tracked up to six so far. They plan on monitoring the pack throughout the winter and getting a collar on one of the wolves in the summer of 2016 to monitor the pack’s movements.

The confirmation of a new pack is a good sign that the current wolf population is naturally re-establishing itself. A new count will be conducted this spring.

Hopefully these trends will continue on in 2016, furthering conservation of our natural world and the wildlife species who live in it.

Inspired by our work? Consider making a donation today to help us continue providing vital care to wild animals in need.

Found a wild animal in need? Find out how PAWS can help.

Interested in a career in wildlife rehabilitation? Check out internship/externship opportunities at PAWS.

Comments

Ivory tusks trade should be controlled worldwide.

Ivory trading is illegal here in Kenya

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been posted. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment