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By Jen Mannas, PAWS Naturalist

This month, in Washington, wildlife is on the move – which makes it prime time for wildlife viewing!

Snow goose flock11

Some wildlife species are coming out of hibernation while others are migrating, competing for breeding territories, and starting to attract mates.

To highlight just a few:

  • Grey Whales are passing through heading north to their feeding grounds in the Arctic
  • Seabirds are moving to their breeding grounds
  • Sandhill Cranes are stopping over in the Columbia Basin on their way to Alaska

PAWS may not treat all of the species listed above here in our dedicated wildlife rehabilitation facilities, but this is the time of year we receive other species who are on the move as well.

We recently cared for a Silver Haired Bat who was seeking warmth in someone’s living room—pictured below, being measured to identify which species it is—and two adult Anna’s Hummingbirds and a Red-breasted Sapsucker, who were all found on the ground unable to fly.

Silver Haired Bat, March 2015 JM

When wildlife moves through an urban environment species can often come into contact with hazards they wouldn’t normally experience in a more natural setting. They may run into a window, get struck by a vehicle, or get attacked by a domestic animal.

When incidents like these happen, they may need our help.

So, while you're out enjoying the fresh air and warmer temperatures this spring, keep an eye out for wildlife who may need a helping hand.

Found a wild animal in need? 
If you're near Lynnwood in Washington, find out how PAWS can help. If you're outside Washington State, we would recommend you reaching out to your local wildlife rehabilitation facility or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for advice. 

This month, there are also plenty of opportunities for us to celebrate and learn about the wildlife moving through the state. Check out some of these fun festivals:

The “Wings Over Water” Northwest Birding Festival (March 13-15) is an annual event that features wildlife viewing field trips in the NW corner of Washington.

Make a date with the Tundra Swan Festival, an annual event commemorating the return of the tundra swans to NE Washington. It happens March 21 in Usk, Washington. 

Great-Blue-Heron,-Nisqually-NWF,-020213-KM-11-KS-resize

The Othello Sandhill Crane Festival takes place in Othello, Washington (March 27-29) and highlights the spring return of Sandhill Cranes to the greater Othello area and Columbia National Wildlife Refuge.

If you're looking for something a little closer to home, keep the last week in March in mind and head down to Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge (between Tacoma and Olympia).

You can view hundreds of migrating waterfowl and other wading birds, like the Great Blue Heron pictured right who was photographed there last year.

For recent whale sightings, you can check out the Orca Network.

And, as if all these fantastic events weren't enough to keep you busy, did you know we're right in the middle of National Wildlife Week

This year's event, organized by the National Wildlife Federation and running through March 15, celebrates the joys and challenges of living with wildlife

Happy wildlife viewing, and peaceful co-existing with our wild neighbors!

Want to get involved with wildlife rehabilitation at PAWS? Become a volunteer or consider our internship opportunities.

Inspired by our work? Make a gift and help us continue providing a safe haven for wildlife in need.

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Comments

Wild animals needs should be a priority in every country.

I love wild animals and good too for tourist attraction

great read

But with migration of birds there comes the danger of transmission of diseases, zoonoses, what contributions are being done to mitigate this as the animals are migrating?

nice article!

Great read

Good information.

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