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6 posts from July 2013

 

The most commonly asked question asked about Bald Eagle 13-0164 was, “She got stuck in what?” The answer, “A fish turbine”, didn’t usually do much to clear the matter up for the person doing the asking. Even if you know that a fish turbine is something that facilitates the safe passage of fish at a hydroelectric dam, it doesn’t help explain how an eagle gets stuck in one. But that is what this bird did. She ended up with hypothermia, a deep laceration in her left wing, and multiple abrasions and contusions for her trouble. She also ended up on the surgery table at PAWS, where her injuries were treated by wildlife veterinarian Dr. John Huckabee.

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Continue reading "An Eagle Survives A Puzzling Predicament" »

 

Besides purring and warming laps, stretching and scratching is what kitties do best. But stretching and scratching are not just fun activities for the cats, they're natural behaviors that provide stress relief, exercise and mental stimulation.

Donate a Stretch & Scratch for the catsThese activities are especially important for cats in the shelter environment, where the animals have limited space to perform natural behaviors such as jumping, stretching and scratching.

That's where Stretch & Scratch pads come in! The corrugated cardboard pads attach to the enclosure doors, allowing the cats to stretch their muscles, clean their nails and scent-mark with their paws.

Help us keep our feline friends happy and healthy by donating a case of Stretch & Scratch pads to PAWS! Each case supplies 50 cats with their very own scratching pad.

Donating is easy! Go to Stretch&Scratch.com, purchase a case of Scratchers and ship them directly to PAWS at the following address:

PAWS
15305 44th Avenue West
Lynnwood, WA 98087

Your Stretch & Scratch donation will help keep the kitties at PAWS exercised and entertained while they wait for their forever homes.

Donate a case of Stretch & Scratch pads to PAWS!

 

 

This fellow looked a little grumpy when we first met him. But that’s because he was prematurely bumped out of the nest by his larger siblings, and he had tumbled some 60 feet to the ground. Fortunately, he was able to slow his fall enough with his still-developing flight feathers to avoid serious injury. But a city street is not a safe place for a young Merlin not yet able to fly, so one of the bird’s concerned human neighbors snatched him up and brought him to PAWS.

Merlin-131437,-in-exam-room

Continue reading "A Merlin Family Reunion" »

 

Looking for a feline friend?

Come visit our Kitten Kissin’ Tent at the Alley Cats Adoption Event on Thursday July 11 from 5-8pm. You’ll find our tents with adorable (and adoptable!) cats and kittens, fun games for the kids, snacks, drinks and more.

Event details:
Thursday, July 11
Pioneer Square’s First Thursday Art Walk
5 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Enter through Nord Alley behind 314 – 1st Avenue South, Seattle, WA 98104 (between Jackson & Main or Occidental Ave & 1st Ave S)

For more information, contact Nikki Somers at nikki@isiseattle.com

Visit paws.org to see all of our available pets!

 

It's every pet guardian's worst nightmare—your beloved cat or dog has gotten loose, and they're nowhere to be found. You try calling for them, and canvassing the neighborhood hoping to spot them, but they're still missing. Don't panic! If your companion animal is lost, act quickly and follow these steps:

Prevent-lost-petsLook locally. Begin your search as soon as you realize your pet is missing, and visit the Missing Pet Partnership for specific strategies on how to find lost cats and lost dogs. Search your home carefully first—under beds, in closets, dark places, behind bulky furniture—in case your pet may be hiding. Shaking a food dish, treat jar or favorite toy will sometimes lure animals out of a hiding place.

If your pet isn't in or around the home, take a slow ride or walk around the neighborhood. Ask friends or neighbors if they’ve seen your pet, and be sure to bring along a recent photo to show them. Check under porches and shrubs, and ask neighbors to check in sheds and garages in case your pet was accidentally locked in.

Search the shelter. Visit PAWS or the local animal shelter that services your area. Looking in-person is the best way to ensure that you and your pet are reunited.

Ask authorities. Contact your local animal control to see if they have found your pet. Some communities provide a "free ride home” for dogs and cats who are wearing a current city license, and if you can provide officers with your current contact information. Ask to file a lost report.

ID's, please. If your pet has a microchip, contact the microchip company to make sure your pet’s registration is up-to-date with current phone numbers and contact information. Some microchip companies take lost reports over the phone. If you are not sure of the microchip brand, contact the veterinary clinic or shelter where your pet was microchipped, or visit petmicrochip.org.

Try the trap. For lost cats, consider renting a humane trap as many displaced cats have not gone far from their homes. Fewer than 7% of cats who come into the shelter are reunited with their families, but more than 50% of lost cats are found by their own families when they use humane traps and other methods described on the Missing Pet Partnership website.

Lost a pet? Visit paws.org for help.

 

 

For most Americans, the Fourth of July holiday is a time for fun, family and fireworks. But the holiday can be a nightmare for our four-legged friends. As you make your plans to celebrate Independence Day, please keep your pets in mind and follow these tips to ensure your cat or dog's safety this Fourth of July.

Fourth of July Pet Safety1. Fireworks may be fun for us, but the loud noises are stressful and scary for pets. In fact, more pets run away on July 4 than any other day of the year. Keep your dog or cat securely inside the home and provide them with a quiet, comfortable place to rest. If your pet is especially scared of loud noises, you can turn on "white noise" sources such as the radio, the TV or a fan.

2. If you're expecting guests, set aside a room just for your animal with food, water and a bed. Crowds can overwhelm your pet, and giving them a quiet space to retreat to will go a long way in helping them feel safe and relaxed.

3. If you're heading out to a community fireworks display, please resist the urge to bring your pup along to the festivities. Large crowds and loud noises can be scary and overwhelming.

4. Keep dangerous items, such as alcoholic beverages, fire crackers, citronella candles or insect coils, and lighter fluid out of your pet's reach.

5. In the event that your animal does escape the house, make sure that they are wearing a collar with identification tags, and that all contact information is up-to-date. Also ensure that your pet's microchip information is current. 

For more tips on avoiding holiday hazards, visit PAWS.org

Happy Fourth of July from all of us at PAWS!