By Katherine Spink, PAWS Staff

In our Adorable Adoptables features, we usually tell the story of a dog and cat who are taking a little longer than most to find their perfect home. This week we’re switching things up and profiling a special pair of inseparable pooches looking for their forever family together.

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Approximately 8 years old, purebred Dachshunds Briar Rose and Buzz arrived at PAWS earlier this month.

They were transferred to us from Everett Animal Shelter through our Placement Partner Program – a partnership initiative with other shelters and rescue organizations that maximizes the chance of animals in our care finding loving homes.

These two peas in a pod are super affectionate and love nothing more than an easy going stroll or a lazy day of lounging at home. If this describes your life, how about sharing it with this truly lovable pair? One word of warning – you’ll want to set aside time to watch Buzz doting on Briar Rose, too cute for words!

It’s safe to say they’re both big fans of treats, Briar Rose especially and Buzz is her willing accomplice in procuring nibbles out of any generous hand. As a result, they've become a slightly portly pair. If you have a will of steel and the ability to resist four of the most imploring eyes we’ve ever seen, you could be the perfect family to get this compact couple back in shape.

Come lounge around with Buzz and Briar Rose in Lynnwood, WA today – once you do, we’re sure you’ll realize that two is most definitely better than one.

Is your future playmate patiently waiting at PAWS?

Volunteer and help find loving forever homes for animals in our care.

Already found your perfect canine companion? Take part in PAWSwalk together and raise funds to help us continue providing care for adorable adoptables like Briar Rose and Buzz.


By Jen Mannas, Naturalist

You probably know by now that PAWSwalk is our biggest fundraiser of the year. You probably also might think that it only helps PAWS rescue thousands of cats and dogs. But did you know it also helps care for thousands of wild animals too?

Each year, PAWS Wildlife Center cares for over 3,000 wild animals from as many as 260 different species. Our main goal is to rehabilitate sick, orphaned and injured animals so that they can be released and become a functioning member of their wild populations once again. To do that, we rely on the donations raised at PAWSWalk every year.

Wildlife at PAWS - August 2014

Today, we are caring for over 200 patients at PAWS Wildlife Center. This summer alone, we have taken in and helped River Otters, Bald Eagles, American Robins, Virginia Opossums and Eastern Cottontails, a Bobcat, Harbor Seals, Mallard Ducks, Hummingbirds, Raccoons, owls, deer, a frog, weasels, swifts and many many many more. In, fact some of the animals in our care have made the news, and another one has been part of an ongoing story.

All of these animals come to us with different needs; from the food they eat, to the habitat they live in, to the medical attention they need, to the amount of time they will be in our care. PAWSwalk helps us support these needs by providing the funds to purchase food, medication, and medical supplies as well as upkeep facilities so we can continue to help these amazing creatures.

Because of PAWSwalk - and PAWSwalkers like you - we have been able to rehabilitate and release hundreds of animals this summer including River Otters, a Western Screech Owl, grown birds from our baby bird nursery, orphaned opossums and squirrels, a Peregrine Falcon, a Creeping Vole, and a Townsend’s Chipmunk, just to name a few.

With the support from people like you who join in our annual PAWSwalk we are able to continue helping animals of all kinds. So, register for PAWSwalk today and come join us at King County's Marymoor Park in Redmond, WA on September 6th! It’s a great way to have fun and raise money for animals. It will be a wild time!

Want to help care for wildlife at PAWS year round? Volunteer.

Help us to continue providing a safe haven for rehabilitating wildlife - make a donation.


By Jen Mannas, Naturalist

Late summer is a bustling time of year for gulls in the Seattle area and here at PAWS. People are seeing them more readily now and finding injured birds as adult gulls are out gathering food for their hungry chicks.

Gulls are often referred to as seagulls lumping all of the species together. However, there are

actually 19 different species of gulls that live in North America, 14 of which spend part of the year in

Herring Gull sub-adult
Herring Gull - sub-adult

Washington. The term seagull is also very misleading as this suggests they only live near the ocean when in fact many species of gulls live, feed and nest inland. An example of this is the ring billed gull which is very common in eastern Washington.

 

Gulls nest in densely packed colonies and lay their eggs either directly on the ground or in a small nest bowl.The chick’s eyes are open and they are very mobile when they hatch; they are even capable of leaving the nest shortly after hatching. Gulls are very protective parents and will dive bomb potential predators to keep them away from their chicks. If you see healthy chicks that appear to be alone one of their parents is probably nearby watching and it is best to stay away.

Gulls are fantastic fliers and can actually float motionless in the air when looking for food. Gulls can eat just about anything including insects, small fish, other birds and small mammals. They also act as nature’s cleanup crew by scavenging on dead animals and other organic litter which can pose health threats to humans. Gulls are resourceful, smart, and very adaptable. Many species have learned to live and thrive in conjunction with humans, some species have been documented using objects as tools, they have a very complex method of communication and they have a highly developed social structure.

Glaucous Winged Gull chick
Glaucous Winged Gull chick

We have several gulls, from two different species, in our care at the PAWS. They are at different stages of development from very small chicks up to adults. This requires different levels of care from all of our staff and volunteers as they await their return to the wild.

 

Fun Fact: Most adult gulls have a red spot at the tip of their bill, newly hatched chicks use this spot as a target and will peck at it stimulating their parents to feed them.

Want to help care for wildlife at PAWS? Volunteer.

Help us to continue providing a safe haven for rehabilitating wildlife - make a donation.


By Kellie Benz, PAWS Staff

Sometimes, what we’re looking for is right in front of us. We’ve had a lot of visitors to PAWS lately, all walking through our Lynnwood and Cat City locations searching for their perfect companions. Many have left with their new best friend, and we’re always so proud to know we helped to build that family.

As always, our ‘Adorable Adoptables’ stories cover two companion animals who – despite all of their eager tail wagging or welcoming purrs – can’t seem to attract their perfect human. The volunteers who see them every day; those who walk them and brush them, those who cuddle them, who settle their nerves and soothe their yearning hearts, know how precious and loving these little beings are and they know how deserving they are of potential adopters’ attention.

So we hope our tales of their true personality, will encourage you to take a second look. Celeste3 - Aug 3 - 2014 - Kbenz

This week’s feline adorable adoptable is the always sophisticated miss Celeste. Regal and elegant, and mighty choosy of those worthy of her attention, lovely lady Celeste is a looker with a crooked ear. The ear, a tiny blemish on her otherwise model-perfect good looks, gives a hint to her life lived. A Siamese/mix of 10 years with a light brindle coat – and if you’re lucky enough to see them – sparkling sapphire blue eyes. We say lucky, because Celeste doesn’t let just anyone see the true glimmer of her dazzling personality.

Grumpy Cat might look the part, but Celeste is the real persnickety feline deal. Celeste doesn’t suffer fools gladly, so you may be able to attract her attention for a playful swat at one of her favorite toys, but you’ll have to win her heart if you want anything more. And she’s got oodles of affection waiting for you! Celeste isn’t interested in a fast pace, busy home. She’d like a quiet, adult only environment where she can thrive and feel like someone special’s one and only. Celeste's adoption fee is waived until September, so don’t put off meeting her at our downtown Seattle Cat City today!

Over in doggy world, at our Lynnwood Companion Animal location, Reba awaits her true forever home. Adopted once then left behind in a divorce dispute, Reba is pure love in a very compact body.

She’s been at PAWS longer than most and we don’t know why she keeps getting passed over. She’s friendly and welcoming to anyone who approaches her. She’s quick to break out her great big smile with every greeting and eager to show you her fluorescent orange ball, in the hopes that you’ll know how to play!

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A mix of Australian Cattle Dog, Terrier and American Put Bull, this shorty-with-a-story deserves a second look. All of 9 years old, her affection is undeniable and all of the volunteers coo over her easy personality and well behaved walking etiquette. With eons of energy and an affinity for car rides, Reba is a co-pilot in waiting for the right active adventurer.

In her quietest moments, she’s a lapdog extraordinaire and knows exactly how to curl up for an afternoon nap. Reba respects her feline friends, but wouldn’t want to live with one. She’d rather be dashing off to a regular weekend road trip!

Are you the ideal human that Celeste or Reba are waiting for?

Is your future playmate patiently waiting at PAWS?

Volunteer and help find loving forever homes for animals in our care.

Help us continue to provide care for all our adorable adoptables.


By Jen Mannas, Naturalist

Leaving home can be scary and a hard thing to do for humans but imagine you are a four week old baby owl (owlets) leaving your nest cavity, high up in a tree, for the first time.

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Owl fledglings are not great fliers at first; for the first five or six weeks out of the nest they hop from branch to branch or take short flights following their parents. During this time owlets can fall to the ground where they stay under a close eye of their parents until they get off of the ground. Sometimes these falls result in an injury and the owlet may not be able to make it back to safety.

This is what happened to a Western Screech Owlet in Redmond. He was found in a driveway by the homeowners one June morning not moving or vocalizing. When he was still in the same spot later that evening they assumed something was wrong. They scooped him up and brought him to PAWS. In our Wildlife Center, he was unable to stand very well and was putting all of his weight on his left leg.

After examining his x-rays PAWS' veterinarian team determined he had a broken right leg. They promptly put a splint on it and placed him under observation to monitor him for any nerve damage in his right foot. After only a few days he was standing on both legs again and could partially flex his right toes. Within two weeks, of his arrival at PAWS, the splint was removed and he was placed in an outdoor enclosure where we continued to monitor his grasping ability.

After 24 more days of cage rest he was able to successfully fly and grasp his perches with both feet. On July 17, at sunset, he was released back to his forest in Redmond where he found safety amongst the trees.

Want to help care for wildlife at PAWS? Volunteer.

Help us to continue providing a safe haven for rehabilitating wildlife - make a donation.


By Katherine Spink, PAWS Staff

Some of the cats and dogs that arrive at PAWS are with us a matter of days before they find their happy ending. Some wait patiently for a few weeks until their perfect match walks through the door. And then there are those who are with us for much longer, looking for that extra special human to call their own…

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Beautiful Russian Blue Hobbes arrived at PAWS in Lynnwood, WA in May of this year. He immediately made friends with staff and volunteers, who’ve described him as easy going, talkative, and the kind of cat that will headbutt and purr at anything. Belly rubs and catnip don’t do much for him, but he’s super fun to play with---his toys of choice being laser pointers and anything on the end of a wand!

So, why the long wait for a home?

Shortly after his arrival, Hobbes tested positive for Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV), the cat equivalent of HIV. FIV is typically passed from cat to cat through deep bite wounds, and more commonly seen in free roaming, unneutered males that get caught up in territorial disputes or aggressive fighting.

Although there’s no cure for FIV, cats with the virus can live a normal life for many years---and, at the tender age of 2 years old, Hobbes has many happy years ahead of him.

He’ll need to be an indoors only cat and either have other FIV positive kitties as house buddies or be the only cat in the family. FIV can’t be transmitted from cat to human, so there’s no need for concern about family members being at risk.

A stress-free environment can also help, and Hobbes recently spent time away from the busy shelter environment in the care of one of our foster families. A glowing report came back, describing him as “fantastic, loving, super fun to play with, a great cat”.

We know Hobbes has a lot of love to give and, with the attention and care he deserves, will be the perfect feline addition to the right family. Is that you? Come say hi to Hobbes at PAWS in Lynnwood, WA today!

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Five year old Carl is a Shepherd mix who’s been with us since April. A few weeks after his arrival, all was looking good and he was on his way to a new home---sadly five weeks later he was returned to us. Turns out he loves time with humans so much that he just couldn’t bear his pet parents being away at work for long periods every day.

It’s safe to say our kennels at PAWS in Lynnwood, WA aren’t Carl’s favorite place to be and he can sometimes give the wrong impression when people stop by to say hello. The truth is, he’s a sweet and active dog who would much rather be on a long hike with you. He’d also love to lean up against you and get the space between his shoulders scratched---it’s just he can’t get close enough!

A PAWS volunteer recently took Carl for an off-site adventure to Meadowdale and discovered he’s a great car traveler. She even enticed him into a stream for a paddle. And, as far as other dogs go, he likes to meet and greet them, especially the ladies!

Watch Carl in training mode in our outdoor exercise area:

Carl’s idea of the perfect home is feline-free with teenagers and adults for company. He’d love a rotating schedule at home so he sees his humans coming and going through the day. Active daytimes and relaxing evenings are his idea of heaven. Is this your life? Come and play with Carl today!

Is your future playmate patiently waiting at PAWS?

Volunteer and help find loving forever homes for animals in our care.

Help us continue to provide care for all our adorable adoptables.

By Amy Webster, Community Education Coordinator

We’re getting the most out of the long and warm Seattle summer days by reaching out into our community. We’ll be out and about in the coming weeks and hope to see you!

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Did you see us at the Mill Creek Festival? We were there (pictured, right)—enjoying hundreds of visitors to our PAWS tent on July 19 and 20.

A fun community event in the heart of Mill Creek, this 2-day festival was a great place to share the good work we do for animals and offer information about volunteering, adoption, foster care, wildlife rehabilitation, and our upcoming PAWSwalk!

August continues to grant us many opportunities to get out and about in our community.

Here's a summary of our events, click on the links within each listing for full details:

Saturday, August 2: Kind Choices Kids’ Activities Table at Whole Foods Market, Redmond
Learn how everyday shopping choices can help save and protect animals on our doorstep and around the world. We'll have interactive games, advice on sustainable farming and labelling, and a scavenger hunt!

Tuesday, August 5: Mountlake Terrace National Night Out
Join us as we share our work with the Mountlake Terrace community and civic leaders at the 18th edition of their popular annual event.

Wednesday, August 6: Kids Helping Animals Workshop (8yrs+) at Whole Foods Market, Lynnwood Come discover the many ways that kids can help animals with this Service Learning Workshop including craft activities, practical information on animal care, and interactive games. 

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Thursday, August 7: Alley Cats Adoption Event
PAWS is bringing adoptable kittens to Pioneer Square? Must be summertime! Join us in our kitten kissing tent (pictured, right) where loving individuals and caring families get the chance to meet our kitties up close.

Tuesday, August 12: Fun with Cat Genetics
Is it true that all calico cats are female? Are all orange tabbies male? Join University of Washington Genome Sciences lecturer Anne Paul and find out the answers to these questions and more! Keep checking back for updates on this one, time and location still to come.

Saturday, August 16: Chico’s Community Event Helps PAWSwalk at Alderwood Mall, Lynnwood
If you love fashion and support PAWS, this is the perfect event for you. Treat yourself between 11am and 2pm, and 10% of your purchase price will be donated to PAWS!

Tuesday, August 19: Fundraising 101 Workshop (8yrs+)
Hey kids! Do you want to help animals at PAWS? Our fundraising workshop, including a PAWS tour, will walk you through the steps to run a successful fundraiser.

Thursday, August 21: Enrichment Service Learning Workshops (8-13yrs)
Fun workshops for kids on Companion Animal and Wildlife care. Join us and learn as you make fleece blankets for kittens and cats, and enrichment items for recovering wildlife in our care.

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Saturday, August 23: Path to PAWSwalk at Whole Foods Market, Redmond
Come sign up for PAWSwalk 2014 (pictured, right)! We’ll have staff and laptops on hand to help, and fun activities for any little ones whose moms and dads want to register for one of the most fun fundraisers of the year.

Phew, a busy month indeed—with a little bit of something for everyone. We look forward to seeing you out and about! 

Keep up to date with all our event news—follow our Events blog.

Help educate others in animal welfare and humane education—volunteer.

Help us continue inspiring the humane educators of the future—make a donation to PAWS.


By Jen Mannas, Naturalist

Along with all of the baby birds, here at PAWS we have an array of baby mammals in our care; among them are Virginia opossums.

Most of the baby opossums, or joeys, brought to the Wildlife Center are orphaned as a result of their mothers being hit by cars. Opossums are very primitive mammals that have been around since the time of the dinosaurs and have changed little since then. They are very slow to react to headlights, other animals and even people, because their primitive brains process information very slowly.

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When we see opossums we may not immediately think about how unique they are or their ecological importance. They are the only marsupial in the United States and they have a long prehensile tail used for climbing trees and hanging upside down, although they do not sleep in that position.

They have 50 teeth, the most of any land mammal in North America, which they use to eat just about anything from seeds to meat - making them good seed dispersers, great at insect and rodent control, as well as keeping the roadways and sidewalks clean.

They have several anti-predator tactics and, although playing opossum helps them fend off some predators, they also have a super power against snakes. They are partially or totally immune to snake venom and will even kill them for food. They rarely become sick with rabies or other wildlife diseases and, even though they have a small brain, they have a very good memory and a very sensitive nose; enabling them to find and remember where food is.

Since females give birth to such a large number of babies at one time the litters brought to PAWS can be as many as 13 babies. This requires a lot of dedication and care from our staff and volunteers to raise them and release them back into the wild.

Want to help care for wildlife at PAWS? Volunteer.

Help us to continue providing a safe haven for rehabilitating wildlife - make a donation.


By Katherine Spink, PAWS Staff

Having been in our care for several months now, this week’s Adorable Adoptables take patience to a new level. Given their love of tummy and cheek rubs, and super-sunny dispositions, the fact they’re still here is a surprise to the staff and volunteers that enjoy their company every day.

Tuxedo cat Timothy is two years old and has been at our Companion Animal Shelter in Lynnwood, WA since February. He’s become a firm staff favorite since he arrived, not least because of his incredible patience in waiting for his soul mate to walk through the door.

If you’re looking for someone playful, Timothy fits the bill perfectly. He enjoys everything from stringy things to jingle toys to furry toy mice:

And then there’s the attention seeking part of him that never turns down a good cheek rub! Timothy is a true gentleman and absolute sweetheart – so, why the long wait for a forever home?

One of the reasons Timothy might be being overlooked is that he has an Upper Respiratory Infection (commonly known as a URI), which affects his nose and throat. Its most recognizable symptoms include sneezing, nasal congestion, conjunctivitis, and discharges from the nose or eyes.

Timothy

The good news is that most cats with a URI can be treated at home. In cases where nasal congestion is a factor, simply spending 10 to 15 minutes in a steamy bathroom regularly can provide great relief. This congestion also affects a cat’s sense of smell, which often leads to a decreased appetite – serving a highly palatable canned food is the solution here. A simple moist tissue will help wipe any irritation-causing discharge away.

With lots of love and care, Timothy and his pet parents can enjoy a full, happy life together in spite of his snuffles. Escaping the hustle and bustle of the shelter environment is just what Timothy needs – the sooner he finds his forever home, the sooner he can kick back, relax and feel better.

Come spend time with Timothy in Lynnwood, WA today. We challenge you to resist his charms!

Ten-year old Chihuahua Mimi is a well-traveled pup who’s been searching for her forever home longer than most.Transferred from a Los Angeles shelter in 2013 and adopted in the Puget Sound area, she was subsequently surrendered to the Regional Animal Services of King County and transferred to PAWS in April of this year.

Mimi tummy rub image

Mimi’s been hanging out with one of our cherished foster care families recently, and is now back at PAWS in Lynnwood, WA ready to find her new pet parents.

Here’s a snippet from her exemplary foster care report:

“Her favorite activities are napping, cuddling with her people and getting treats! She gets very happy when you say her name – she’ll give you the best smile and even rolls on her back for tummy rubs. She sleeps through the night and likes to have some extra blankets in her bed in case she feels like burrowing in them! It may take her a few days to settle into her new surroundings, but her delightful and happy personality soon shines through.”

Sweet senior Mimi enjoys the quieter things in life so is hoping for a chilled out home where she can nap and cuddle her days away close to her humans. She also doesn’t mind the idea of having an easy-going buddy around, to share those moments only a canine companion can fully appreciate.

Call PAWS in Lynnwood, WA today and arrange a tummy rub with Mimi!

Is your future playmate patiently waiting at PAWS?

Help us continue to provide care for all our adorable adoptables.

Volunteer and help find loving forever homes for animals in our care.


By Kellie Benz, PAWS Staff

Before you go imagining what fun rehabilitating a teenage bear might be, consider this; we don’t want American Black Bear 2014-1317 to know anything about us here at PAWS, we don’t want her to bond with us, to appreciate the time and care we’re taking for her. In fact, we hope never to see her again once she is released.

While that might sound cold, it’s actually the kindest care we can offer her.

So it goes that when it’s time to deliver food to a wildlife patient at PAWS, like American Black Bear 2014-1317, not a word is said. She is remotely shifted to a clean enclosure, safely tucked away from staff. We clean her empty enclosure and search for leftover food items from the prior day. There is no face to face or verbal interaction between caretakers and bear patients.

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American Black Bear 2014-1317 arrived at PAWS a few months back, delivered to us by Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife officers when she was discovered frequenting garbage bins in Renton. This juvenile bear was much thinner than a bear her age should be.

She had obviously not found her own territory in the wild due to the enticing aromas coming from people’s food scraps outside their homes. She was a wild bear with wild instincts and she deserved a second chance to make it on her own in her own habitat.

Thanks to the care at PAWS, she’s now over 20lbs heavier and gobbling up a steady diet of bear-appropriate food. She is curious and interested, with a preference for long branches with leaves and buds and fruit to discover along the way. She’ll eat everything we give her, everything that is, except radishes.

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Her distaste for one root vegetable aside, American Black Bear 2014-1317 is growing every day and getting stronger. She still has a way to go and she still needs to gain more weight. But every indication says she’s doing well.

If all goes according to plan, she’ll be retrieved by the same WDFW Officer who brought her to us and returned to the wilderness, away from garbage bins, where she can be more successful.

Once released, her time with PAWS will be a forgettable experience that she puts behind her as she prepares to find a den of her own to sleep in through the upcoming winter months.

In the PAWS Wildlife Hospital kitchen there is a flurry of activity these days, rehabilitators and volunteers sharing information while chopping up fruits and vegetables and weighing portions. In another room, PAWS staff note the details of progress for each animal into our database system.

Black bears aren’t the only animals PAWS cares for day to day - there are about 120 different species spending time at PAWS hospital this summer. Native species like deer and owls and Harbor seals and hummingbirds – all with specific diets, unique needs and for some, routine and complicated surgeries and medical care – are finding their way to health and wholeness at PAWS as we speak. It’s a busy time of year, but one filled with hope, too.

American Black Bear 2014-1317 is one of many species who are getting a second chance thanks to PAWS Donors. Click here and help us help animals.

PAWS Wildlife always needs dedicated volunteers – find out how you can help.

Follow our PAWS Wildlife blog.